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Program

 

  • Monday 9th November 2015
    4.00pm Registration  
    5.30pm Pre-Dinner Drinks  
    6.45pm Dinner & Welcome Official Opening of the Ageing and Living Well Think Tank and Launch of the Innovation Collaborative
    by Hon Jay Weatherill MP, Premier of South Australia
    8.30pm Hypothetical "How can perceptions be changed from viewing ageing as a cost to an opportunity for growth and prosperity?
    9.30pm Dessert and Coffee  
    10.30pm Conclusion  

    8.30pm Hypothetical

    "How can perceptions be changed from viewing ageing as a cost to an opportunity for growth and prosperity?"
    Moderator: Professor Alison Kitson, Dean of Nursing, University of Adelaide.

    12 Participants

    4 Keynote Presenters to Think Tank:
    • Professor Trish McDougall-Covin, Indiana University, USA (Entrepreneurship)
    • Dr Kathleen McCormick, Health Informatics, USA (Informatics)
    • Mr John Corcoran, Chairman of Russell Kennedy (Legal)
    • Mr Peter Inge, Joint Managing Director, Zig Inge Group (Property)
    8 Representatives of Government, Academe, Practice and Industry Organisations:
    • Hon John Hill (Ret.), SA Minister for Health (2005-2013) (Politics)
    • Mr Lui DiVenuto, President SA, Australian Association of Gerontology (Peak Body)
    • Ms Andrea Slattery, MD/CEO, SMSF Association (Wealth Industry)
    • Mr Raymond Spencer, Chair, SAHMRI / SA Economic Development Board (Research & Economics)
    • Ms Jeanette Walters, Assistant Director, Office for the Ageing, SA Health (Policy)
    • Professor Greg Tegart AM, Academy, Technological Sciences & Engineering (Technology)
    • Dr David Panter, CEO, ECH Inc. (Aged Care Services)
    • Mr Brad Crouch, The Advertiser and Sunday Mail (Media)
  • Tuesday 10th November 2015
    8.00am Registration  
    9.00am Keynote Speakers

    Professor Trish McDougall-Covin
    Turning a Wicked Problem into a Golden Opportunity Advantage - through Social Entrepreneurship

    Mr John Corcoran
    Challenges and Opportunities

    10.00am Launch of 'Encore' Expo Hon Zoe Bettison MP, Minister for Ageing (South Australia)
    10.15am Coffee Break  
    10.45am Keynote Speakers (cont'd)

    Professor Alison Kitson
    Health systems for older users: have we lost the plot?

    11.15am

    Questions/Discussion

     
    11.45am Workshops (concurrent; choose one)

    1. Municipalities and Ageing Well
    Mr Nick Lund
    Local government and ageing well - optimising opportunities

    2. Medicine and Ageing Well
    Professor Renuka Visvanathan
    Tailoring Healthcare For Every Consumer: Even The Frail!

    3. Lifestyle
    Mr Greg Mackie OAM
    Boomers or Bust - arts audiences and their golden years

    4. Ageing and Work
    Mr Jeff Fiebig
    A Journey not a Destination

    1pm Lunch  
    1.45pm Workshops (concurrent; choose one)

    5. Women and Ageing Well
    Dr Charrlotte Seib
    Women and Ageing Well

    6. Nutrition
    Dr Ngaire Hobbins
    Eating to Age Well

    7. 'Encore' Careers & Transitions
    Dr Mike Rungie
    Transition from midlife career to encore career

    8. Golden Opportunities for Silver Innovation - Chinese and Japanese Perspectives
    Associate Professors Florian Kohlbacher & Janusz Tanas
    How demographic changes give rise to entrepreneurial opportunities to meet the needs of older people

    3.00pm Afternoon Tea  
       

    9. Men and Ageing Well
    Professor Robert Adams
    Men's Health – The X factor and Y it matters

    10. Finance and Economics
    Mr Raymond Spencer
    Healthy Ageing – A new Economy for South Australia?

    11. Person (Consumer) Centred Care
    Dr Kate Barnett
    Engaging with Ageing

    12. Active Ageing - Digital Entrepreneurship and SeniorPreneurs
    Dr Peter Balan
    SeniorPreneurs: supporting an exciting transition to a new life of personal enterprise and active ageing

    3.30pm Workshops (concurrent; choose one)  
    4.45pm Reporting Session on Workshops 1-12 Moderators: Professor Alison Kitson & Dr Lois Hazelton
    5.30pm Conclusion of Session &
    Travel to SAHMRI Auditorium
     
    6.30pm Cocktails & Debate
    'Research and Innovation'
    at SAHMRI Auditorium, North Terrace
    “Do Research and Innovation provide equal inputs to Ageing Well experience, or is one more important to our future well-being?
    Chair: Emeritus Professor Murray Gillin AM
    8.00pm Conclusion  

    Keynote Speakers

    Professor Trish McDougall-Covin

    Turning a Wicked Problem into a Golden Opportunity Advantage - through Social Entrepreneurship
    As the large population segment of baby boomers moves toward retirement age and are seen by many to be a "wicked problem" for today's resource-constrained society, baby boomers have the opportunity to instead be a solution to many of society's social problems. Boomers offer an unexpected and extraordinary resource to Australia's society. Boomers are years from obsolescence, and many are well educated and have a wealth of valuable experiences and accumulated knowledge. Most importantly, they are at a point in life in which they have freedom of choice as to how they spend their time.

    Boomers have the luxury to embrace an encore career in social entrepreneurship and to invest their passion into work for the greater good. An encore career in social entrepreneurship offers boomers both a continued income and a boundless sense of self fulfilment.

    Mr John Corcoran

    Challenges and Opportunities
    Worldwide our societies are ageing. I will look at the relevant demographics both in Australia and offshore. Did you know that the first person to live to 150 is alive today? This will present many challenges for ageing well and aged care. How will it be funded? Will the regulation of the sector have to change? Workforce issues will need to be resolved. Where will the necessary staff be found? What skills will they require?

    Professor Alison Kitson

    Health systems for older users: have we lost the plot?
    This presentation will look at the experiences of older people routinely using acute health services and consider what we should be doing to improve that overall experience. From design features, to policies, practices, routines and attitudes, this presentation will identify a number of innovative ways of ‘thinking and behaving differently’ that could make a difference to experiences and health outcomes for older patients. Of particular interest will be the role of healthcare professionals in this innovation journey as they work in partnership with older people.


    11.45am Workshops (concurrent; choose one)

    1. Municipalities and Ageing Well | Mr Nick Lund

    Local government and ageing well - optimising opportunities
    In 2012, the City of Boroondara became the first Victorian metropolitan municipality to be certified by the World Health Organisation as an age-friendly city. The workshop will share some examples of what this means in practice and the various steps involved in progressing age-friendliness in an ageing community.

    2. Medicine and Ageing Well | Professor Renuka Visvanathan

    Tailoring Healthcare For Every Consumer: Even The Frail!
    The use of chronological age per se in determining what is best in medicine is outdated. Physical, medical, environmental, social and other factors impact on health outcomes. These factors should contribute to medical decision making if best outcomes are to be achieved for every consumer. Baby boomers will likely expect to receive healthcare tailored to meet their (and their families) health and care needs. How should we prepare?

    3. Lifestyle | Mr Greg Mackie OAM

    Boomers or Bust - arts audiences and their golden years
    Australia's cultural economy has been built upon state subsidy and a growing reliance of box office. So what happens when the boomer core of our arts audience becomes time and asset rich but cash-flow poor? Should the state subsidise empty seats? A major survey of boomer intentions signals new challenges for access and equity and a call for a new pricing paradigm to retain audiences.

    4. Ageing and Work | Mr Jeff Fiebig

    A Journey not a Destination
    We are at the beginning of the 21st Century but still carry 19th and 20th century notions of the journey of our working and “retirement” lives. This presentation will explore trends in “ageing - the journey not the destination” - The coming working skills challenge: What might a working life look like through the process of ageing; “New” jobs and the ageing workforce; The need for new paradigms, new attitudes, new language – in the language of 1984 “NEWTHINK”


    1.45pm Workshops (concurrent; choose one)

    Women and Ageing Well | Dr Charrlotte Seib

    5. Women and Ageing Well
    Older women who report good general health often share a number of common characteristics including sustained healthy lifestyle behaviours, a positive perception of their quality of life, and fewer chronic conditions. However, confusion remains about the specific health behaviours likely to yield maximum benefit for least effort in women as they age. This presentation will examine the relative influence of modifiable lifestyle factors on health-related quality of life in Australian women during midlife and beyond.

    6. Nutrition | Dr Ngaire Hobbins

    Eating to Age Well
    We baby boomers expect plenty: the 20 to 40 years ahead are to be productive and enjoyable but that achievement is thwarted by ageing bodies not capitalising on nutrients as younger bodies do. Understanding differences and adapting food/lifestyle choices accordingly gives the best chance at continuing vitality and independence.

    7. 'Encore' Careers & Transitions | Dr Mike Rungie

    Transition from midlife career to encore career
    There is a serious side to transition – setting goals and strategy and driving them – but an increasing amount of transition is looking more like adventure, with the challenge being to get older people into an adventurous frame of mind. Such “transition processes” are quite well established and their use admired in younger people, but people in their 70s, 80s, 90s simply don’t borrow them or take them seriously.

    8. Golden Opoortunities for Silver Innovation - Chinese and Japanese Perspectives | Associate Professors Florian Kohlbacher & Janusz Tanas

    How demographic changes give rise to entrepreneurial opportunities to meet the needs of older people
    The recognition and exploitation of opportunities arising from demographic changes in the form of population aging is discussed. Using a qualitative approach, we analyse opportunity identification and exploitation in the “silver” market (i.e. the market targeting older people). Based on 6 case studies, we present how firms in different industrial contexts and user settings tackle these needs, thus highlighting opportunity recognition and exploitation in connection with demographic change.


    3.30pm Workshops (concurrent; choose one)

    9. Men and Ageing Well | Professor Robert Adams

    Men's Health – The X factor and Y it matters
    The number of men aged over 65 years is projected to increase 300% by 2060. This will be accompanied by a dramatic increase in the number of men living with prostate cancer (PCa) and one or more of the leading specific causes of health loss in men, e.g. cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, musculoskeletal disorders and common mental health disorders (depression and anxiety). These are mostly preventable but better treatment and a fresh approach with a high potential to reduce the physical and economic burden of disease are required. New insights, accounting for the influences of psychological, social, environmental and behavioural risk factors are required to innovate approaches to prevention, screening and management of disease.

    10. Finance and Economics | Mr Raymond Spencer

    Healthy Ageing – A new Economy for South Australia?
    The popular narrative is that ageing is a social burden, that ageing saps an individual’s emotional energy and intellectual creativity and that our future rests solely in the hands of the young. The State’s ageing population is actually one of its strongest assets and greatest opportunities for new business and jobs growth. Treated as an asset, this emerging growth area can positively transform our perception of becoming older and, in doing so, inject further vitality into our communities and become an area rich in economic prosperity for South Australia.

    11. Person (Consumer) Centred Care | Dr Kate Barnett

    Engaging with Ageing
    Traditional concepts of aged care are being challenged and recent reforms are moving to a consumer-driven system focused on individual choice, and support for re-ablement, while capitalising on new technologies to maximise independence. How will these innovations enable aged care services to become part of a person’s life and engage with their lives, rather than defining them and the way they live?

    12. Active Ageing - Digital Entrepreneurship and SeniorPreneurs | Dr Peter Balan

    SeniorPreneurs: supporting an exciting transition to a new life of personal enterprise and active ageing
    SeniorPreneurs is an exciting new network organisation for those over 55 who wish to explore the transition into a new life of personal enterprise that may lead to involvement in the creation of new social enterprises or new for-profit ventures. Learn how SeniorPreneurs offers connections with like-minded people, and access to valuable support networks to help you to realise your dreams of starting something new, worthwhile, and meaningful.


    Debate

    "Do Research and Innovation provide equal inputs to Ageing Well experience, or is one more important to our future well-being?”
    Chair: Emeritus Professor Murray Gillin AM

    Team A 'Research is More Important' Team B 'Innovation is More important'
    • Leader: Professor Pascale Quester
    • Member: Dr David Panter
    • Member: Professor Jennie Shaw
    • Leader: Professor Steve Wesselingh
    • Member: Mr Nick Callinan
    • Member: Mr Ian Hardy AM
  • Wednesday 11th November 2015
    9.00am Keynote Speakers

    Dr Kathleen McCormick
    Innovation in Healthcare IT – Bringing Creativity to the Industry’s Most Pressing Challenge

    Mr Peter Inge
    Build it and they will come – the Village of Dreams

    10.00am Launch of 'Technology' Expo Hon Kyam Maher MLC, Minister for Manufacturing and Innovation (South Australia)
    10.15am Coffee Break  
    10.45am Keynote Speakers (cont'd) Professor Noel Lindsay
    Leveraging Opportunities to Enhance the Ageing Well Experience – An Innovation Collaborative
    11.15am Questions/Discussion  
    11.45am Workshops
    (concurrent; choose one)

    13. Informatics
    Associate Professor Chris Pearce
    Technology supporting health professionals: a force multiplier.

    14. Resource Planning
    Mr Peter Scully
    The Changing Truth about Money

    15. Built Environment and Community Connectedness
    Dr Helen Feist
    How can we create liveable communities to enable ageing well?

    16. Maintaining Health Using a Medical Home
    Professor Nigel Stocks

    1.00pm Lunch  
    1.45pm Workshops (concurrent; choose one)

    17. Relation-Centred Care
    Ms Megan Corlis
    Sharpen your Focus

    18. Policy
    Ms Jeanette Walters
    Innovation and policy – Getting the Mix Right

    19. Technology
    Professor Greg Tegart AM
    Assistive Health Technologies for Independent Living

    20. Ageing Innovations - an International Perspective
    Associate Professor Janusz Tanas
    The world’s population is ageing, what next?

    3.00pm Afternoon Tea  
    3.30pm Reporting Session on Workshops 13-20 Moderators: Professor Noel Lindsay & Emeritus Professor Murray Gillin
    4.15pm Concluding Session Summary of opportunity findings and recommendations on policy, practice and research
    Moderators: Professors Noel Lindsay, Murray Gillin, Alison Kitson & Dr Lois Hazelton
    5.30pm Farewell drinks  

    9.00am Keynote Speakers

    Dr Kathleen McCormick

    Innovation in Healthcare IT – Bringing Creativity to the Industry’s Most Pressing Challenge
    Ever since the baby boomers were born, everything they touched turned to gold. The new golden opportunity with this ageing population is to keep them healthy with quality life and positive outcomes and prevent chronic diseases and life threatening diseases with personalized care. When they do get sick, to manage their personalized care preventing side effects and managing symptoms. The first is through mobile applications, shaping what it is they need, and how they can use it in their life to advance mobile healthy lifestyles. The second is to be participants in personalized care in the prevention of disease, side effects of medical interventions, and symptom management when disease occurs. Both rely on innovations in Healthcare Information Technology. Enculturating the aged baby boomer consumer is driving the utilization of mobile computing and providing areas of flexibility in living arrangements and their mobile lifestyles. The benefits are weighed by the barriers to massive implementation. Both will be described. The boomers role in personalized care raises a spectrum of issues requiring policy and regulations that will be discussed. Some of the barriers to personalized care will be explained so as to raise issues in planning for the boomers role in this highly specialized advancing science of personalized care.

    Mr Peter Inge

    Build it and they will come – the Village of Dreams
    The evolution of the retirement village industry has seen built form product innovation falling out of step with a dramatically changing demographic and more demanding cohort of potential customers. The retirement villages of the last 30 years have catered to a very different target market to that being experienced today and what will be encountered in the future. Sadly innovation in built form and service offerings has lagged these shifts with the result being product obsolescence and sluggish management practices. The industry has consequently suffered reputation damage both in the consumer and investment markets. The adage “ build it and they will come” no longer holds true. The village of dreams is the retirement village of the future - what will it look like and what will it be like to live in??

    Professor Noel Lindsay

    Leveraging Opportunities to Enhance the Ageing Well Experience – An Innovation Collaborative
    What does it take to live well as you live longer? Boosting our rate of collaboration will be essential for Ageing Well growth and innovative sustainability and to create a new wave of jobs, ‘encore’ careers, professional services, quality facilities and research commercialisation in Australian Health and Ageing industry that are based on sophisticated knowledge transfer in sustainable sectors where Australia has a competitive edge (adapted from quotation by Hon. Ian Macfarlane, Minister for Industry and Science, Oct. 2014). Using the dimensions of entrepreneurship, the concept and reality of an innovation collaborative: that identifies opportunities for enhancing the ageing-well experience of ‘Boomers’; facilitates development of the opportunities into practical outcomes; and networks venture resources that deliver the outcomes to a sustainable market of ageing-well citizens: is presented with the potential to recharge and reanimate our community so we can hang loose and live well into boomer-hood and beyond.


    11.45am Workshops (concurrent; choose one)

    13. Informatics | Associate Professor Chris Pearce

    Technology supporting health professionals: a force multiplier.
    The 'digitization' of general society has not been matched by the healthcare sector due to the perception that healthcare is a 'people' profession, requiring face to face interactions to be effective. Yet Healthcare is facing severe shortages as the workforce ages. The perception is that technology to support healthcare is all about depersonalising care: telemedicine, homecare robots and complex hospital interventions. The reality is much more complex than that, and healthcare is in the process of being transformed. From 'Big Data', personalised healthcare, technology enabling 'person centred care' and better structuring of care, this presentation will outline how technology does not mean the loss of the 'people' profession.

    14. Resource Planning | Mr Peter Scully

    The Changing Truth about Money
    For those under 60 personal financial decisions are driven by affordability and advisability. But between 60 and 75 years applicability becomes increasingly significant influence on personal empowerment and choice. Using longitudinal case studies a unique insight will be provided into the breadth and scope of opportunities for innovation in these financial services

    15. Built Environment and Community Connectedness | Dr Helen Feist

    How can we create liveable communities to enable ageing well?
    One important aspect that shapes an older person’s experience of ageing is the availability of resources; both basic services such as shops, transport and medical care, but also access to life enriching resources such as family, friends and social opportunities. All older people should be able to participate in society according to their needs, desires and capacities; while being provided with adequate protection, security and care when they require assistance, regardless of where they choose to live.

    16. Maintaining Health Using a Medical Home | Professor Nigel Stocks

    Stay-at-home Boomers: Helping the active elderly to live well at home
    As they enter their retirement years, Boomers are considering their options. These rebels are unlikely to follow their parents into aged care. To live independently and remain active in all facets of community life, stay-at-home Boomers will need responsive healthcare and support. This workshop will introduce a framework under which Boomers can 'age well'. Professor Stocks will explore opportunities to support Boomers to stay physically, socially and mentally active and remain in their own homes into the future.


    1.45pm Workshops (concurrent; choose one)

    17. Relation-Centred Care | Ms Megan Corlis

    Sharpen your Focus
    The 20th Century has given us the gift of longevity. Ageing is no longer a peripheral issue. Policy makers, researchers, community leaders and society need to sharpen their focus in order to effectively realise the opportunities provided by an ageing population. This means real engagement -underpinned by rights based principles – to seek bold, creative and new ways. Relationship centred approaches help support older people to have a voice regardless of their circumstance. From the baby boomers in great health through to the most disabled we need to find ways to listen in order to create an age friendly future.

    18. Policy | Ms Jeanette Walters

    Innovation and policy – Getting the Mix Right
    This workshop will explore using innovative approaches to developing policy and using policy to support innovation. There will be an opportunity to discuss a number of these approaches and see how they can work in practice.

    19. Technology | Professor Greg Tegart AM

    Assistive Health Technologies for Independent Living
    Conventional models of healthcare delivery are being challenged as our health system is stretched by an aging population, the growing burden of chronic disease and a decreased workforce to cope with these demands. Assistive technologies can enable elderly and disabled people to continue to live in their own homes for longer, control their treatments better, and maintain close connections with family and society. Many technologies are already available but are not widely deployed due to a number of barriers related to their disruptive effects on current systems such as medical bureaucracies, financial support from Governments, social and privacy issues. There is a need for a patient-centred national interdisciplinary network to resolve these issues and bring in a new approach to healthcare.

    20. Ageing Innovations - an International Perspective | Associate Professor Janusz Tanas

    The world’s population is ageing, what next?
    From 1950 - 2000 the world’s population exploded and grew from approximately 3 - 6 billion; a stark contrast to the rate of growth in the 200 years from 1750 - 1950 of approximately 1 - 3 billion people. We all know that societies are living longer than ever before and coupled with declining birthrates, there are fewer younger workers and therefore by default, tax payers support the vast and ever increasing retiree population across the globe. Many may see this as a phenomenon whereby the industrial countries will continue to slowdown and the rest of the world will continue to experience ongoing exponential growth in the overall world population, but in fact the opposite is true. Birthrates are plummeting everywhere and the industrially advanced nations are on the cutting edge of decline, with the rest of the world following directly behind. By 2050, the number of people aged over 65 is predicted to increase from 7.8 percent of the current global population of about 500 million, to about 16 percent. By 2016, for the first time in history, people aged over 65 will outnumber children under five (National Institute of Aging and U.S. Department of State, 2007). What’s next?

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